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The L'Manberg National Anthem is the official national anthem of L'Manberg, composed by a fan by request of Wilbur Soot. It was later properly adopted by the founding five during the War for L'Manberg Independence, and different versions have been made as the nation progresses and develops. Notably, there was never an adaptation made for the country's reform into Manberg. Wilbur has said the song was made because Tommy used to sing Hallelujah to the plants, in hopes of them growing faster. The song is based off "Hallelujah" by Leonard Cohen, with the lyrics being changed.

First Version: Before the War

[Verse 1]
I heard there was a special place,
where men could go and emancipate
the tyranny and bloodlust of their rulers.
Well this place is true, you needn't fret.
with Wilbur, Tommy, Tubbo, and Eret.
A pretty big and not blown up L'Manberg.

[Chorus]
It's L'Manberg, It's L'Manberg. It's L'Manberg, It's L'Manberg.

This version of the anthem served more as a prototype, having been written before the nation got its first foothold of independence. It was written before Eret's betrayal, and is the one version of the song that properly includes them as one of the founding members of the nation.

Second Version: After the War

[Verse 1]
Well, I've heard there was a special place,
Where men could go and emancipate,
The brutality and the tyranny of their rulers.
Well, this place is real, we needn't fret,
With Wilbur, Tommy, Tubbo, fuck* Eret,
It's a very big and not blown-up L'Manberg

[Chorus]
My L'Manberg
My L'Manberg
My L'Manberg
My L'Manberg**


*If the singer is deciding not to cuss, it is acceptable to substitute with "not Eret" instead.

**There are several variations, depending on the tone of the recitation. For example, Wilbur sang "my L'Manberg" as a final departure song as he saw the walls of L'Manberg destroyed after his exile, taking on a sad and mildly possessive tone. Other versions include "for L'Manberg", which is more patriotic, and "It's L'Manberg" which is seen as more lighthearted, like the retelling of a historical past.

It is this version of the anthem that is most well known for being used throughout the post-election exile arc, having been ultimately written on the walls of the button room during the final detonation scheme that would be used against the nation.

Third Version: Reclamation L'Manberg

[Verse 1]
Well, I've heard there was a special place,
where men could go and emancipate
the brutality and the tyranny of their rulers.
Well, this place is real, we needn't fret,
with Fundy, Tommy, Tubbo, and Eret,
It's a very big and not blown-up L'Manberg.

[Chorus]
My L'Manberg
My L'Manberg
My L'Manberg
My L'Manberg

This version didn't see much usage, and never caught on. It was proposed after Wilbur detonated L'Manberg in the TNT Plot, and the remaining living members of the nation questioned if he deserved to be in the nation's national anthem.

Current Version: Completed Symphony

[Verse 1]
I heard there was a special place,
Where men could go emancipate,
The brutality
And tyranny
Of their rulers.
Well, this place is real you needn’t fret,
With Wilbur, Tommy, Tubbo, fuck Eret
It's a very big and not blown up L’Manberg.

[Chorus]
My L'Manberg
My L'Manberg
My L'Manberg
My L'Manberg

[Verse 2]
For freedom and for liberty,
Our nation sought to build on these,
A victory for all under democracy.
Well the darkness came and then it went,
We built a home and watched it sink,
And from the rubble, there emerged L’Manberg

[Chorus]
My L'Manberg
My L'Manberg
My L'Manberg
My L'Manberg

[Verse 3]
With bloodied hands
and weakened knees,
Our people rose like the phoenix,
Our empty fields and canals ‘round L’Mantree.
With sweat and tears we armed our ranks,
We laid foundations in our land,
And from every lips from here up to infinity;

[Final Chorus]
We sing L’Manberg
We sing L’Manberg
We sing L’Manberg
To our L’Manberg

This version of the anthem was written and published by Ghostbur after his death and the reconstruction process of the nation. It is signed as if it were written by Alivebur, listing him as the 1st President of the nation, implying that it was started before his death.

Doomsday Version: Post-Destruction

[Verse 1]
I heard there was a special place,
where men could go emancipate,
the brutality, and tyranny of their rulers.
Well, this place is real, you needn't fret,
with Wilbur, Tommy, Tubbo, fuck Eret
A very big and, a little bit blown up, L'Manberg

[Chorus]
My L'Manberg
My L'Manberg
My L'Manberg
My L'Manberg

[Verse 2]
For freedom and for liberty.
Our nation sought to build on these,
and victory for all under freedom.
Trouble came and then it went,
we built our walls and watched them break,
And from everywhere from here up to forever.

[Chorus]
Sing/say L'Manberg
Sing/say L'Manberg
Sing/say L'Manberg
Sing/say L'Manberg

After the events of the Doomsday War, the line "It's a very big and not blown up L'Manberg" was rewritten to say "a little bit blown up L'Manberg", to reflect the devastating explosions the nation suffered. The second half of the song was imprompt by Ghostbur and Quackity, as they both had forgotten the second verse, and the last written version had been destroyed by the explosions.

Dream Version: Bye, L'Manberg[1]

[Verse 1]
Well, I heard there was a special place,
where men could go and emancipate
the brutality, and the tyranny of their rulers.
Well this place was real, and now it's gone,
Techno and Dream planted a bomb.
It's a very big and definitely blown-up L'Manberg.

[Chorus]
Bye L'Manberg
Bye L'Manberg
Bye L'Manberg
Bye L'Manberg


This version was written and performed by Dream after the events of the Doomsday War. It is a parody of the original anthem, intended as a mocking farewell to the nation he had finally successfully destroyed.

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